Close cookie details

This site uses cookies. Learn more about cookies.

OverDrive would like to use cookies to store information on your computer to improve your user experience at our Website. One of the cookies we use is critical for certain aspects of the site to operate and has already been set. You may delete and block all cookies from this site, but this could affect certain features or services of the site. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, click here to see our Privacy Policy.

If you do not wish to continue, please click here to exit this site.

Hide notification

  Main Nav

Casey Stengel

Cover of Casey Stengel

Casey Stengel

Baseball's Greatest Character
Borrow Borrow
The definitive biography of one of baseball's most enduring and influential characters, from New York Times bestselling author and baseball writer Marty Appel.
As a player, Charles Dillon "Casey" Stengel's contemporaries included Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner, and Christy Mathewson . . . and he was the only person in history to wear the uniforms of all four New York teams: the Dodgers, Giants, Yankees, and Mets. As a legendary manager, he formed indelible, complicated relationships with Yogi Berra, Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, and Billy Martin. For more than five glorious decades, Stengel was the undisputed, quirky, hilarious, and beloved face of baseball—and along the way he revolutionized the role of manager while winning a spectactular ten pennants and seven World Series Championships.
But for a man who spent so much of his life in the limelight—an astounding fifty-five years in professional baseball—Stengel remains an enigma. Acclaimed New York Yankees' historian and bestselling author Marty Appel digs into Casey Stengel's quirks and foibles, unearthing a tremendous trove of baseball stories, perspective, and history. Weaving in never-before-published family documents, Appel creates an intimate portrait of a private man who was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1966 and named "Baseball's Greatest Character" by MLB Network's Prime 9. Casey Stengel is a biography that will be treasured by fans of our national pastime.
The definitive biography of one of baseball's most enduring and influential characters, from New York Times bestselling author and baseball writer Marty Appel.
As a player, Charles Dillon "Casey" Stengel's contemporaries included Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner, and Christy Mathewson . . . and he was the only person in history to wear the uniforms of all four New York teams: the Dodgers, Giants, Yankees, and Mets. As a legendary manager, he formed indelible, complicated relationships with Yogi Berra, Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, and Billy Martin. For more than five glorious decades, Stengel was the undisputed, quirky, hilarious, and beloved face of baseball—and along the way he revolutionized the role of manager while winning a spectactular ten pennants and seven World Series Championships.
But for a man who spent so much of his life in the limelight—an astounding fifty-five years in professional baseball—Stengel remains an enigma. Acclaimed New York Yankees' historian and bestselling author Marty Appel digs into Casey Stengel's quirks and foibles, unearthing a tremendous trove of baseball stories, perspective, and history. Weaving in never-before-published family documents, Appel creates an intimate portrait of a private man who was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1966 and named "Baseball's Greatest Character" by MLB Network's Prime 9. Casey Stengel is a biography that will be treasured by fans of our national pastime.
Available formats-
  • OverDrive Read
  • EPUB eBook
Languages:-
Copies-
  • Available:
    1
  • Library copies:
    1
Levels-
  • ATOS:
  • Lexile:
  • Interest Level:
  • Text Difficulty:

Recommended for you


Excerpts-
  • From the book 1

    Mail Call

    It was time for the mail at the Stengel home.

    Casey Stengel, now nearly eighty, loved this time of day. He would get up to three hundred letters every week, and since his home address—­and phone number, of course—­were listed in the phone book under "Stengel, Charles Casey," it was not hard to know where to send a fan letter: 1663 Grandview Avenue, in Glendale, California. He and his wife, Edna, had lived there since her father built the place forty-­six years before, in 1924. People wanted his autograph, and he loved that they did.

    Now, in 1970, in his retirement years, the home was a "splendid" place to be Casey Stengel. Old friends would visit, or new ones would just ring the bell, and he would regale them with stories, jumping with ease from Babe to Joe D to Yogi to Mickey to Marvelous Marv.

    In his den, he would sit back in his ancient Yankee underwear (Edna was always on him to wear Mets underwear) and observe the world through six decades of baseball and worldly wisdom.

    The home sat on a quiet two-­lane street in a fashionable neighborhood, near the homes of the USC baseball coach Rod Dedeaux and Babe Herman, his old Brooklyn Dodger teammate from the 1910s. Most people thought of Casey as either a Yankee or a Met, but of course he was a baseball lifer, who had played or managed almost everywhere and played with or against nearly everyone.

    He batted against Grover Cleveland Alexander, chased fly balls hit by Babe Ruth, sent Ron Swoboda up to pinch hit, and moved Cleon Jones to left field. His career had spanned John McGraw and Tug McGraw.

    Was there a ballpark he hadn't stood in? Never mind all those major-­league and minor-­league parks over more than half a century. For over fifty years, starting in 1910, the year of his first spring training, he had to check train schedules, road maps, and eventually flight schedules to get to his next training camp.

    In 1910 and 1911, he traveled to Excelsior Springs, Missouri; then he went to Montgomery, Alabama (1912), Augusta, Georgia (1913–­14), Daytona Beach, Florida (1915–­16), Hot Springs, Arkansas (1917), Jacksonville, Florida (1918), Birmingham, Alabama (1920), Gainesville, Florida (1921), San Antonio, Texas (1922–­23), Marlin, Texas (1923), St. Petersburg, Florida (1924–­25), Jackson, Tennessee (1926–­27), Biloxi, Mississippi (1928–­29), Anniston, Alabama (1930), Miami, Florida (1931), Clearwater, Florida (1932), Miami (1933), Orlando, Florida (1934–­35), Clearwater (1936), Bradenton, Florida (1938–­40), San Antonio, Texas (1941), Sanford, Florida (1942), Wallingford, Connecticut (1943), Bartlesville, Oklahoma (1945), Boyes Hot Springs, California (1946–­47), San Fernando, California, 1948), St. Petersburg (1949–­50), Phoenix, Arizona (1951), and St. Petersburg (1952–­60, 1962–­65, and 1966–­74 as a consultant).

    And, of course, that excludes the road games and barnstorming games heading north that were part of spring training. One could learn a lot about people and a lot about America just by being Casey Stengel.

    And his recall! Late in his life, some fan might come near the railing and say, "Casey! Casey! My dad sold you a pair of shoes in Biloxi in 1928!" Casey might rub his jaw and say, "I was almost out the door and he sold me a pair of socks, too. He was a good salesman!"

    His home was not quite a mansion, nothing you would find in Bel Air, but it was grand in the upper-­middle-­class neighborhood in which it stood. Or "splendid," as he loved to say about...
About the Author-
  • MARTY APPEL was the youngest public relations director in baseball history when George Steinbrenner elevated him to the New York Yankees post in 1973. He is the author or coauthor of numerous books, including the New York Times bestselling Munson: The Life and Death of a Yankee Captain and Pinstripe Empire: The New York Yankees from Before the Babe to After the Boss. He resides in New York City.
Reviews-
  • Publisher's Weekly

    December 12, 2016
    Appel (Munson: The Life and Death of a Yankee Captain) relies on recent access to the unpublished memoir of Casey Stengel’s widow, Edna, as well as new digitized versions of vintage small-town newspaper reports and old letters sent by the Baseball Hall of Famer to family members, to write a contemporary biography of the man the MLB Network calls “Baseball’s Greatest Character.” Unpolished and unpredictable as a player and a manager, Stengel became an enduring icon of the sport who would hide a live sparrow under his ball cap during a game, publicly complained about his salary, and made no secret of his disdain for Jackie Robinson. Born Charles Dillion Stengel in Kansas City, Mo., he adopted the nickname “Casey” from the initials of his hometown and briefly pursued dentistry before embarking on a Major League Baseball playing career that lasted from 1912 to 1925. He then managed teams in the majors between 1934 and 1965. He felt most comfortable in New York, and tales featuring the likes of Yogi Berra, Joe DiMaggio, and Mickey Mantle play a large role in Stengel’s story. Appel, whose tenure as public relations director for the New York Yankees was just getting started when Stengel died in 1975 at age 85, acknowledges that his friend Robert Creamer wrote a solid Stengel biography in 1984. But new interviews and access to family documents warranted this new bio, which reveals a more personal side of Stengel.

  • Kirkus

    Starred review from December 1, 2016
    Sports journalist Appel (Pinstripe Empire: The New York Yankees from Before the Babe to After the Boss, 2012, etc.) delves deeply into the baseball career and personal life of Casey Stengel (1890-1975), a solid player and legendary manager.Citing new material unavailable to previous Stengel biographers and chroniclers of the New York Yankees, the author offers an informative, smoothly written account of a complex and relentlessly interesting subject. In 2009, the Major League Baseball Network sponsored a campaign to identify the most memorable "character" in the sport's long history. Stengel placed first, ahead of Yogi Berra, Babe Ruth, Satchel Paige, and numerous other legends. Presumably, Stengel won because of his occasional antics on the field and in the dugout as well as for the way he spoke, an idiom dubbed in the 1930s as "Stengelese"--the New York Times described it as a "unique way of turning short answers into run-on sentences." However, Appel demonstrates convincingly that Stengel was no clown. He could speak clearly and grammatically when he chose to do so, he was an insightful student and teacher of baseball, he understood how to connect with others, he was a sophisticated investor who accumulated wealth, and he was a loving husband to his wife for decades. Despite an unusual physique, he demonstrated outstanding athleticism as a youth and rose quickly through the ranks of professional baseball as a hitter and outfielder. After retiring from active playing, his baseball intelligence led him to managing in the minor and major leagues. Though his records with those early teams are unimpressive, when the New York Yankees hired Stengel to manage the 1949 season, the legend for winning began, lasting through 1960. After those remarkable baseball seasons, Stengel reluctantly retired, only to return in 1962 to lead the newly created New York Mets franchise. Stengel is unquestionably one of baseball's most significant characters, and Appel is the perfect fit to chronicle his life. One of the more skilled biographies baseball fans could hope to find.

    COPYRIGHT(2016) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

  • Library Journal

    January 1, 2017

    Casey Stengel (1890-1975) is a baseball legend. He managed a dominant Yankees team that won eight pennants between 1949 and 1960 and was involved in several historical games and moments as a player for the Brooklyn Dodgers and Pittsburgh Pirates, among other teams. Beyond these accomplishments, Stengel is widely known for being an eccentric and quirky personality who injected levity into his management and playing styles. This work by frequent baseball chronicler Appel (Pinstripe Pride) and former PR director for the New York Yankees provides an excellent look at Stengel's life through more than 50 years of baseball. Appel's narrative and easy writing style pairs well with Stengel's lighthearted antics, and the intertwined excerpts from the unpublished memoir of Stengel's wife, Edna, is a welcoming parallel story of lifelong love and partnership. The author has done his homework, and this book benefits from firsthand accounts and historical perspectives that create an engaging story from beginning to end. VERDICT Baseball history buffs will definitely want to add this biography to their shelves. Suitable for both YA and adult readers.--Matt Schirano, Univ. of Bridgeport Lib., CT

    Copyright 2017 Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

  • The Tampa Bay Times "A definitive, intimate biography of the man whose 50-year career as a player and manager -- including seven World Series wins -- was one of the most dazzling in the game."
  • Spitball "A balanced and powerful biography that breathes new life into the legend whose career not only transcended the lives of so many well-known players . . . told by a biographer whose knowledge of the New York Yankees is second to none."
Title Information+
  • Publisher
    Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • OverDrive Read
    Release date:
  • EPUB eBook
    Release date:
Digital Rights Information+
  • Copyright Protection (DRM) required by the Publisher may be applied to this title to limit or prohibit printing or copying. File sharing or redistribution is prohibited. Your rights to access this material expire at the end of the lending period. Please see Important Notice about Copyrighted Materials for terms applicable to this content.

Status bar:

You've reached your checkout limit.

Visit your Checkouts page to manage your titles.

You already have this title checked out.

Want to go to your Checkouts?

Recommendation Limit Reached.

You've reached the maximum number of titles you can recommend at this time. You can recommend up to 99 titles every 1 day(s).

Sign in to recommend this title.

Recommend your library consider adding this title to the Digital Collection.

Enhanced Details

Limited availability

Availability can change throughout the month based on the library's budget.

is available for days.

Once playback starts, you have hours to view the title.

Permissions

The OverDrive Read format of this eBook has professional narration that plays while you read in your browser. Learn more here.

Holds

Total holds:


Restricted

Some format options have been disabled. You may see additional download options outside of this network.

You've reached your library's checkout limit for digital titles.

To make room for more checkouts, you may be able to return titles from your Checkouts page.

Excessive Checkout Limit Reached.

There have been too many titles checked out and returned by your account within a short period of time.

Try again in several days. If you are still not able to check out titles after 7 days, please contact Support.

You have already checked out this title. To access it, return to your Checkouts page.

This title is not available for your card type. If you think this is an error contact support.

An unexpected error has occurred.

If this problem persists, please contact support.

NOTE: Barnes and Noble® may change this list of devices at any time.

Buy it now
and help our library WIN!
Casey Stengel
Casey Stengel
Baseball's Greatest Character
Marty Appel
Choose a retail partner below to buy this title for yourself.
A portion of this purchase goes to support your library.

There are no copies of this issue left to borrow. Please try to borrow this title again when a new issue is released.

Barnes & Noble Sign In |   Sign In

You will be prompted to sign into your library account on the next page.

If this is your first time selecting “Send to NOOK,” you will then be taken to a Barnes & Noble page to sign into (or create) your NOOK account. You should only have to sign into your NOOK account once to link it to your library account. After this one-time step, periodicals will be automatically sent to your NOOK account when you select "Send to NOOK."

The first time you select “Send to NOOK,” you will be taken to a Barnes & Noble page to sign into (or create) your NOOK account. You should only have to sign into your NOOK account once to link it to your library account. After this one-time step, periodicals will be automatically sent to your NOOK account when you select "Send to NOOK."

You can read periodicals on any NOOK tablet or in the free NOOK reading app for iOS, Android or Windows 8.

Accept to ContinueCancel